Coronavirus: ‘Narrowing window’ to contain outbreak, WHO says

The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) has expressed concern at the number of coronavirus cases with no clear link to China or other confirmed cases.

Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus's comments follow Iran's announcement of two more deaths, bringing the total there to four.

The window of opportunity to contain the virus was "narrowing", he said.

Iranian health officials said the virus may already be in "all Iran's cities".

Outside China 1,152 cases of the virus have been confirmed in 26 countries and there have been eight deaths.

They include two deaths in South Korea, which has the biggest cluster of confirmed cases apart from China and a cruise ship quarantined in Japan.

Italy on Friday announced 16 more cases and its health minister said schools and offices would be closed and sports events cancelled in the affected regions.

China has reported 75,567 cases including 2,239 deaths. The new virus, which originated last year in Hubei province in China, causes a respiratory disease called Covid-19.

What did the WHO chief say?

Dr Tedros said the number of coronavirus cases outside China was "relatively small" but the pattern of infection was worrying.

"We are concerned about the number of cases with no clear epidemiological link, such as travel history to or contact with a confirmed case," he said.

The new deaths and infections in Iran were "very concerning", he said.

But he insisted that the measures China and other countries had put in place meant there was still a "fighting chance" of stopping further spread and called on countries to put more resources into preparing for possible outbreaks.

What about the Iran cases?

In Iran the outbreak is centred on the holy city of Qom, south of the capital Tehran, which is a popular destination for Shia Muslims in the region.

Iran reported two more deaths in Qom on Friday, adding to the two deaths it reported on Thursday. A total of 18 cases have been confirmed in the country.

Lebanon has reported its first confirmed case – a 45-year-old woman who was detected as she arrived in Beirut from Qom. The UAE, Israel and Egypt have also reported cases.

Meanwhile Canadian officials said one of the nine cases there was a woman who had recently returned from Iran.

WHO officials said both Iran and Lebanon had the basic capacity to detect the virus and the WHO was contacting them to offer further assistance.

But Dr Tedros said the organisation was concerned about the virus's possible spread in countries with weaker health systems.

What is happening in Italy?

On Friday officials announced 14 confirmed cases of the virus in the Lombardy and Veneto regions of northern Italy. They included five health workers.

None of the new cases is thought to have visited China but the first infected patient, who is now in intensive care, is believed to have caught the virus after meeting a friend who had recently come back from China, AFP reported.

The first patient's pregnant wife and one of his friends reportedly then caught the virus.

Three earlier cases in Italy involved two Chinese tourists from Wuhan – the Chinese city where the virus emerged – and an Italian repatriated from Wuhan.

What is the latest in South Korea?

Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun said it was now an emergency as 100 new cases and the country's second death were confirmed. The country now has 204 cases.

The southern cities of Daegu and Cheongdo have been declared "special care zones". The streets of Daegu are now largely abandoned.

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All military bases are in lockdown after three soldiers tested positive.

About 9,000 members of a religious group were told to self quarantine, after the sect was identified as a coronavirus hotbed.

The authorities suspect the current outbreak in South Korea originated in Cheongdo, pointing out that a large number of sect followers attended the funeral of the founder's brother from 31 January to 2 February.

The sect – known as Shincheonji – which has been accused of being a cult, said it had now shut down its Daegu branch and that services in other regions would be held online or individually at home.

As of Friday, more than 400 members of the church were showing symptoms of the disease, though tests were still ongoing, the city mayor said.

Hand sanitizers and warning signs

By Hyung Eun Kim, BBC Korean Service, Seoul

Many people in South Korea are wearing masks on a daily basis.

Hand sanitizers have been placed at public transport stops and building entrances.

Warning government signs are everywhere. They say: "Three ways to prevent further infection: wear a mask at all times; wash your hands properly with soap for more than 30 seconds; and cover yourself when coughing."

Koreans have also developed several apps and websites that tell you how much risk you face where you are. They show where the infected people are within a 10km radius.

"I can't miss work, what I can do is minimise contact with others and stay at home during the weekend," Seung-hye Lim, a Seoul resident, told the BBC.

"I do wonder if we reacted too laxly initially or if it really is because of the specific service practices of the Shincheonji sect."

So-young Sung, a mother of two in Seoul, told the BBC: "It feels like my daily life is collapsing."

She said she was struggling to find pharmacies that had masks.

She added that checking coronavirus-related alarms from her children's schools and kindergartens was now a daily routine for her.

What about China and elsewhere?

The virus has now hit the country's priRead More – Source

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